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When enough is enough: neighbors and noise

| Mar 21, 2018 | Neighbor Disputes |

No matter the location, having a noisy neighbor in the mix is no fun game to play. While a barking dog every now and then can become a small nuisance, incessant noise can start to impact one’s overall quality of life. Seattle neighbors dealing with these pesky situations have a number of options to turn to, and although each issue can differ from the next, there are some basic tips to handle a situation that is occurring right outside the front door.

HouseLogic weighs the options when it comes to noisy neighbors, first stating that residents can look to their community’s Homeowners Association guidelines to reinforce the peace and quiet. Writing the board manager a letter explaining the issue at hand can help them better develop solutions. The HOA board can serve as the objective mediator between neighbors. Even city noise ordinances can help a case of noisy households in the area; HouseLogic mentions that if the neighbor is loud enough, a citation from a noise enforcement officer might be around the corner. Below are additional options HouseLogic offers:

  • Sue neighbors in small claims court
  • Show neighbors firsthand how loud they are
  • Suggest a board meeting in the community

HouseLogic also states that neighbors may eventually settle down, but that residents may even choose to soundproof rooms or, in extreme cases, move entirely.

Sometimes, the mere decision of confronting a loud neighbor can become the most overwhelming step. Housing market resource The Home Story lists a few do’s and don’ts of handling such tricky situations, suggesting that neighbors meet in person. Doing so could be seen as more personable, less adversarial and respectful. The Home Story also warns against becoming defensive — although it may be difficult to mask emotions during these trying times, neighbors may respond in a positive manner if addressed positively. With the many options to consider when dealing with loud neighbors, communication as a whole could make all the difference.